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MNCH
Maternal, Neonatal and Child Health in Selected Northern Districts of Bangladesh: Findings from Baseline Survey 2008
Shumona Sharmin Salam, Marufa Aziz Khan, Sarah Salahuddin, Nuzhat Choudhury, Peter Nicholls, Hashima-E-Nasreen
December - 2009

This population-based cross sectional survey was done in four maternal, neonatal and child health (MNCH) intervention districts (N=4,800 households) and two control districts (N=2,400 households). Data were collected from women identified as having a pregnancy outcome in the previous year or being mother of a child (12-59 months). Analysis focused on descriptive comparison between districts at baseline. Respondents reported the death of one or more children at different ages, the highest number of deaths occurring during the neonatal period. Sixty-six percent respondents in Nilphamari reported current use of a family planning method. Around 15% respondents reported having an abortion, and 3% reported one event of menstrual regulation which occurred mainly in the third month of pregnancy. Seventy-six percent respondents in Nilphamari had at least 4 antenatal visits compared to 18% in other districts. In Nilphamari, BRAC workers were the preferred provider. Regarding birth preparedness, respondents in Nilphamari were more likely to have saved money, bought a delivery kit, arranged emergency transport and pre-arranged an attendant. Respondents in Nilphamari were more likely than others to use skilled birth attendants (21% vs. 16%) for delivery and receive postnatal care from trained providers. In case of complications, majority sought treatment from informal sector due to cost, distance, lack of perceived need for formal provider, and disapproval from family members. Around 50% newborns in Nilphamari received essential newborn care compared to one-third elsewhere. Eighty-eight percent mothers in Nilphamari reported breastfeeding within one hour compared to 71% elsewhere. In all districts, around 10% respondents reported birth asphyxia and 19% neonatal sepsis. For both conditions, respondents in Nilphamari were less likely to seek help from qualified doctors. Around half of the respondents reported that their children under two months suffered from ARI. Results show that the pilot intervention in Nilphamari may have had an effect on MNCH knowledge and practices which can be validated once longitudinal data are available for the new intervention and control districts.
 
 
 

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